E.J. Waggoner
The Present Truth, June 23, 1898
This poem was at the end of an article by E.J. Waggoner entitled “Greatness”. The poem, as mentioned below, is by Rev. E. Jones.

Jesus said, “If My kingdom were of this world then would My servants fight,” because this is the way of the kingdoms of this world.

When His disciples were quarreling as to which of them should be the greatest, Jesus showed them that what they were seeking for themselves was not true greatness.

He said that in the world, where Satan’s spirit rules, those who win for themselves power over others, and “exercise lordship and authority upon them,” are called “great.”

To the subjects of His kingdom He says: “But so shall it not be among you, but whosoever will be great among you shall be your minister, and whosoever will be the chiefest shall be servant of all.”

These verses, written a long while ago by Rev. E. Jones, show that the “great” men of this world are not those who follow the teachings of Jesus Christ:

Son:
How big was Alexander, pa,
    That people call him great?
Was he, like old Goliath, tall?
    His spear a hundred weight?
Was he so large that he could stand
    Like some tall steeple high;
And while his feet were on the ground,
    His hands could touch the sky?
Father:
No, my child; about as large
    As I or Uncle James.
‘Twas not his stature made him great,
    But greatness of his name.
Son:
His name so great? I know ’tis long,
    But easy quite to spell;
And more than half a year ago
    I know it very well.
Father:
I mean, my child, his actions were
    So great, he got a name
That everybody speaks with praise,
    That tells about his fame.
Son:
Well, what great actions did he do?
    I want to know it all.
Father:
Why, he it was that conquered Tyre,
    And leveled down her wall,
And thousands of her people slew:
    And then to Persia went,
And fire and sword on every side
    Through many a region sent.
A hundred conquered cities shone
    With midnight burnings red;
And strewed o’er many a battle-ground,
    Ten thousand soldiers bled.
Son:
Did killing people make him great?
    Then why was Abdel Young,
Who killed his neighbor, training day,
    Put into jail and hung?
I never heard them call him great.
Father:
Why, no, ’twas not in war;
And him that kills a single man,
    His neighbors all abhor.
Son:
Well, then, if I should kill a man,
    I’d kill a hundred more;
I should be GREAT, and not get hung,
    Like Abdel Young, before.
Father:
Not so, my child, ’twill never do;
    The Gospel bids be kind.
Son:
Then they that kill and they that praise,
    The Gospel do not mind.
Father:
You know, my child, the Bible says
    That you must always do
To other people, as you wish
    To have them do to you.
Son:
But, pa, did Alexander wish
    That some strong man would come
And burn his house, and kill him too,
    And do as he had done?
Does everybody call him GREAT,
    For killing people so?
Well, now, what right he had to kill,
    I should be glad to know.
If one should burn the buildings here,
    And kill the folks within,
Would anybody call him great,
    For such a wicked thing?

Tags: , ,

Leave a Reply

Please answer this small math test (it helps prevent robots from spamming the comments): * Time limit is exhausted. Please reload CAPTCHA.