1. Hearts are aching ev’rywhere burdened by a load of care,
    Always seeking ways to find pleasures to relieve their mind.
Fountains of the world then claim to relieve this inner pain:
    “We have food, and drink, and dress, which will help relieve your stress.”

2. But when all these wares are tried, still the burden greater lies;
    Bills come in too great to pay, mortgages and debts hold sway.
In the strife to pay this price, even health is sacrificed;
    Families are split apart, by this pain within the heart.

3. One lone voice invites us still, to lay off this yoke of ill;
    He who made us, knows what’s best to relieve our aching breast.
“Put aside this yoke.” He cries, “Learn of Me, and then be wise.
    For my yoke will ease your plight, and my burden’s very light.”

4. Here’s the burden He assigns for all overburdened minds:
    Make God’s kingdom first and best, study His pure righteousness,
Seek His will each day and hour, grasp His love and healing pow’r,
    Then all life’s true needful things will come without worrying.

5. Worry’s blind as darkest night, cannot read the future right;
    Jesus sees tomorrow’s grief, knows the way to bring relief,
Has a thousand ways prepared, why be worried, why be scared?
    Serve Him first, and do the right, then your path will shine with light.

based on The Desire of Ages, p. 330 (chapter: “The Invitation”)


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This song is based on the following paragraphs from The Desire of Ages, p. 330-331, chapter 34, “The Invitation”:

There are many whose hearts are aching under a load of care because they seek to reach the world’s standard. They have chosen its service, accepted its perplexities, adopted its customs. Thus their character is marred, and their life made a weariness. In order to gratify ambition and worldly desires, they wound the conscience, and bring upon themselves an additional burden of remorse. The continual worry is wearing out the life forces. Our Lord desires them to lay aside this yoke of bondage. He invites them to accept His yoke; He says, “My yoke is easy, and My burden is light.” He bids them seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and His promise is that all things needful to them for this life shall be added. Worry is blind, and cannot discern the future; but Jesus sees the end from the beginning. In every difficulty He has His way prepared to bring relief. Our heavenly Father has a thousand ways to provide for us, of which we know nothing. Those who accept the one principle of making the service and honor of God supreme will find perplexities vanish, and a plain path before their feet.

“Learn of Me,” says Jesus; “for I am meek and lowly in heart: and ye shall find rest.” We are to enter the school of Christ, to learn from Him meekness and lowliness. Redemption is that process by which the soul is trained for heaven. This training means a knowledge of Christ. It means emancipation from ideas, habits, and practices that have been gained in the school of the prince of darkness. The soul must be delivered from all that is opposed to loyalty to God.

In the heart of Christ, where reigned perfect harmony with God, there was perfect peace. He was never elated by applause, nor dejected by censure or disappointment. Amid the greatest opposition and the most cruel treatment, He was still of good courage. But many who profess to be His followers have an anxious, troubled heart, because they are afraid to trust themselves with God. They do not make a complete surrender to Him; for they shrink from the consequences that such a surrender may involve. Unless they do make this surrender, they cannot find peace.

It is the love of self that brings unrest. When we are born from above, the same mind will be in us that was in Jesus, the mind that led Him to humble Himself that we might be saved. Then we shall not be seeking the highest place. We shall desire to sit at the feet of Jesus, and learn of Him. We shall understand that the value of our work does not consist in making a show and noise in the world, and in being active and zealous in our own strength. The value of our work is in proportion to the impartation of the Holy Spirit. Trust in God brings holier qualities of mind, so that in patience we may possess our souls.

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