1. You will see your Lord coming,
You will see your Lord coming,
You will see your Lord coming
    In a few more days;

Refrain
While a band of music,
While a band of music,
While a band of music
    Shall be chanting through the air.

2. Gabriel sounds his great trumpet,
Gabriel sounds his great trumpet,
Gabriel sounds his great trumpet,
    In a few more days;
Refrain

3. You will see the saints rising,
You will see the saints rising,
You will see the saints rising,
    In a few more days;
Refrain

4. Angels bear them to Jesus,
Angels bear them to Jesus,
Angels bear them to Jesus,
    In a few more days;
Refrain

5. Then we’ll shout, “Hallelujah!”
Then we’ll shout, “Hallelujah!”
Then we’ll shout, “Hallelujah!”
    In a few more days;
Refrain


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This is a well-known early Advent hymn that first appeared in the 1843 edition of the Millenial Harp (the Millerite hymnal) and was later included in James White’s first collections of hymns, which are listed elsewhere on this site.

We have put it in a new musical setting.

It is interesting to trace the influence of this song in the Millerite movement, as recorded by James White, in his book Life Incidents:

1842/1843
Litchfield Plains was my next place of labor. The house was crowded the first evening. In fact, it was with difficulty that I found my way to the pulpit. To call the people to order, the first words they heard from me were in singing,

    You will see your Lord a coming,
    You will see your Lord a coming,
    You will see your Lord a coming,
        In a few more days,
    While a band of music,
    While a band of music,
    While a band of music,
        Shall be chanting through the air.

The reader certainly cannot see poetic merit in the repetition of these simple lines. And if he has never heard the sweet melody to which they were attached, he will be at a loss to see how one voice could employ them so as to hold nearly a thousand persons in almost breathless silence.

But it is a fact that there was in those days a power in what was called Advent singing, such as was felt in no other. It seemed to me that not a hand or foot moved in all the crowd before me till I had finished all the words of this lengthy melody.

Many wept, and the state of feeling was most favorable for the introduction of the grave subject for the evening. The house was crowded three times each day, and a deep impression was made upon the entire community.

Summer 1843
At the close of this service, the Lord’s supper was to be celebrated, and while the friends of Jesus were gathering around his table, I joined with my sisters in singing,

    You will see your Lord a coming, &c.

Our voices were in those days clear and powerful, and our spirits triumphant in the Lord. And as we would strike the chorus of each verse – “With a band of music,” – a good Bro. Clark, who ever seemed to have resting upon him a solemn sense of the great day of God near at hand, would rise, strike his hands together over his head, shout “Glory!” and immediately sit down. A more solemn appearing man I never saw.

Each repetition of this chorus would bring Bro. Clark to his feet, and call from him the same shout of glory. The Spirit of God came upon the brethren, who by this time were seated ready to receive the emblems of our dying Lord.

The influence of the melody, accompanied by Bro. Clark’s solemn appearance and sweet shouts, seemed electrifying. Many were in tears, while responses of “Amen,” and “Praise the Lord,” were heard from almost every one who loved the Advent hope. The emblems were passed, and that yearly meeting closed.

It is also interesting to note that the actions of “Bro. Clark” had a prophetic element to them. Ellen White records a similar type of response when Jesus returns:

As God spoke the day and the hour of Jesus’ coming, and delivered the everlasting covenant to His people, He spoke one sentence, and then paused, while the words were rolling through the earth. The Israel of God stood with their eyes fixed upwards, listening to the words as they came from the mouth of Jehovah and rolled through the earth like peals of loudest thunder. It was awfully solemn. At the end of every sentence the saints shouted, Glory! Hallelujah! Their countenances were lighted up with the glory of God, and they shone with glory as did the face of Moses when he came down from Sinai (glorified). The wicked could not look upon them for the glory. And when the never-ending blessing was pronounced on those who had honored God, in keeping His Sabbath holy, there was a mighty shout of victory over the beast and over his image.
– Spiritual Gifts, p. 145, 146

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